Window on the Bay by Debbie Macomber

“Pride will only take you so far, Mom”

Window on the Bay 

by Debbie Macomber

Published July 16, 2019

Goodreads Rating: 4.05 Stars

My Rating: 3/5 Stars

Plot:

Jenna Boltz’s life is at a crossroads. After a messy divorce from her surgeon husband nearly twenty years ago, she raised her two children on her own, juggling motherhood with her beloved job as a Seattle intensive-care nurse. Now that Paul and Allie have gone to college and moved out, Jenna can’t help but wonder what her future holds.

Her best friend, Maureen, is excited for Jenna’s newfound independence. Now is the perfect time to finally book the trip to Paris they’ve been dreaming of since their college days. But when it comes to life’s other great adventure–dating–Jenna still isn’t sure she’s ready to let love in . . . until an unexpected encounter begins to change her mind.

When Jenna’s elderly mother breaks her hip, Dr. Rowan Lancaster saves the day. Despite his silent, stoic exterior, Rowan is immediately smitten with Jenna. And even though Jenna is hesitant about becoming involved with another surgeon, she has to admit that she’s more than a little intrigued. But when Jenna’s children approach her with shocking news, she realizes that she needs to have faith in love and embrace the unexpected–before the life she has always dreamed of passes her by.

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Review:

Window On the Bay is a slow paced, dual narrative romance following two friends, Maureen and Jenna. These two ladies are best friends, singles Mom who have both raised their kids, worked, provided for their families and found themselves in the routine of being alone.

What I liked about this book is that in true Debbie Macomber fashion, our heroines are older which I think is always a refreshing perspective to read from.  However, because these ladies were older, with grown children who they raised alone, provided for alone, I expected to genuinely feel that I was reading from the perspective of a older woman with age and wisdom under her belt.

When I think of angst I think of me being a 17 year old, starry eyed girl with her head in the clouds and the push and pull, back and forth, love me/love me not I put myself through and others through when I thought I was in love. When I’m reading from the perspective of an older woman, with adult kids, and feel that the author is attempting to write in angst or an older woman’s version of it, I tend to roll my eyes a bit. Now, I’m 32 and am nowhere near having things figured out but I hope that if I am alive and well in my mid forties, early fifties that I will be at some kind of peace with all I’ve endured in my thus far and know it’s either a yes or no for whoever is trying to ease their way into my life. Maureen and Jenna both felt entirely too childish for me!

One has a love interest who is the complete ‘opposite’ to her. She is a librarian, he’s a plumber. It felt a little judgmental at times. The other is worried because professionally, she has Told herself due to what’s happened in the past, she wouldn’t allow herself to go there with another professional like he is.  All of that I fine, if you like it, I love it kind of thing but it was so childish and immature it made the story very unbelievable in parts for me.

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Debbie Macomber crafts her stories in a way where you are completely on board with what issues your heroine needs to work through. Typically you see your completely flawed, but stitched together with good intentions, hero, and are fully aware he Is 100% smitten with the heroine. You then spend the entire story seeing events unravel that lead to the heroine getting a handle on her issues, moving on, and learning to recognize and appreciate our Mister Right whose been under her nose all this time.

In Maureen and Jenna’s cases, things were no different, but as women who have issues because of whatever has happened in their past, they looked for excuses to not give things a chance. Everytime Maureen and Logan had a disagreement she basically dumped him. I was so happy when he finally stood his ground and was like fine, if that’s what you want. I was like heck yes, MOVE ON LOGAN..no one has time for these games! With Jenna whose kids have a dead beat, sperm donor father, she learns that Rowan, her love interest is the father of her daughter’s college roommate. The girl tries to paint him as this deadbeat father too, and it never crosses Jenna’s mind to allow him the opportunity to explain himself. She just kicks him out. Later to find that the girl moved to their city because she knew he was there, and she tried to manipulate him into giving her all the things she wanted. Within moments, Jenna had her mind completely made up that he wasn’t the guy for her because of what his daughter was saying.

I rated this book 3 out of 5 stars because although there was a lot about it I didn’t enjoy, there were things that I did. Most importantly the setting. Debbie Macomber has this way of transporting me to the location unlike any other author. She plucks me out of down south Texas and plops me in the heart of the Pacific Northwest. I love it, every time.

I did enjoy seeing the growth of these women as mothers. Despite their age, they still didn’t have all of the answers, and still had things they had to learn to better their relationships with their kids. I’m not always a fan of the ways Macomber writes the kids of the heroines in her books but in this one in particular, the annoying daughter I couldn’t stand, was able to redeem herself by the end of the story.

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Overall, if you are already a fan of Debbie Macomber’s writing style and way of crafting a story, I do think you’ll enjoy this one. Around this time last year we got Cottage By The Sea released by her, and that’s a story that really impacted me and has stood the test of time. Window On The Bay I can already tell will not have that affect on me. If she is an auto buy author for you already though, I think it is worth reading since you’re already invested in reading what she puts out. Just know it didn’t become a new favorite of mine.

xo.

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